Thailand

Timeline: Thailand’s turbulent politics since 2014 military coup

timeline:-thailand’s-turbulent-politics-since-2014-military-coup

Timeline: Thailand’s turbulent politics since 2014 military coup

Thai protesters, led by student groups, are returning to the streets calling for the ousting of the government less than two years after a general election was held. One group has openly criticised the monarchy, in a rare show of defiance.

Here are the major events that have led up to these protests:

May 22, 2014Military stages a coup, ousting an elected government for the second time in a decade, citing the need to restore order in the face of street demonstrations against a populist government linked to telecoms tycoon Thaksin Shinawatra, who himself was ousted in a coup in 2006.

October 13, 2016Constitutional monarch King Bhumibol Adulyadej dies after a 70-year reign. His son becomes King Maha Vajiralongkorn.

April 6, 2017A military-backed constitution is ratified after being approved in a referendum, with changes requested by King Vajiralongkorn that increased his powers, paving the way for an election.

February 7, 2019The king rebukes his sister, Princess Ubolratana, over a Thaksin-linked party’s nomination of her as its candidate for prime minister. The party is later dissolved by a court before the election.

March 24, 2019 general elections held amid complaints of cheating and vote-buying. Former army chief Prayuth Chan-ocha, who led the 2014 coup and was then prime minister of a military government, heads a pro-army party that wins the most votes.

November 20, 2019Court disqualifies rising opposition figure Thanathorn Juangroongruangkit, leader of the Future Forward Party, from parliament prompting thousands to rally in Bangkok.

January 12, 2020More than 12,000 people join an anti-government “Run Against Dictatorship” in the biggest show of dissent since the 2014 coup. A rival group holds a run in support of Prayuth.

February 21Future Forward Party is banned for illegally taking a loan from its billionaire leader, Thanathorn, prompting small student protests on university campuses.

March 22Given restrictions to stop the novel coronavirus, student protests peter out but online criticism of government continues, with some also directing criticism at the king. The hashtag “#whydoweneedaking?” is posted more than 1 million times.

June 8Small protests held to call for an investigation into the disappearance of an exiled government critic in Cambodia.

June 15Prayuth warns political activists not to criticise the monarchy.

June 24Protesters gather to mark the anniversary of the end of absolute monarchy in 1932.

July 18About 2,500 protesters gather at Democracy Monument, one of the largest demonstrations since the coup, calling for the dissolution of parliament and new elections.

August 4Speakers call for the monarchy’s power to be curbed at a rally attended by hundreds in Bangkok.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-thailand-politics-timeline/timeline-thailands-turbulent-politics-since-2014-military-coup-idUSKCN2520CB

Category: Thailand

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